2023 Winter Online Workshop Lecture Pass

$200.00

Description
Editor's Note

To give better access to the types of craft lectures that will be presented during our conference, we will be offering passes that allow non-enrolled writers to attend faculty talks. The Winter Online Workshop will take place February 15th-20th. Lecture Pass participants will be given links to attend each lecture live. Additionally, all lectures will be recorded and available for up to a month after the conference.

 

THURSDAY

ON THE EKPHRASTIC MEMOIR: RENDERING A CREATIVE COMMONS, with Raquel Gutiérrez
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM PST / 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM EST

Raquel will share insights into the art of description and a practice centered on being a social index—a living human with the ability to provide a set of clear cross-references for particular art happenings. And to do so for and alongside other practitioners, particularly practitioners excelling in the practice of the self through the writing of a self in service to a collective and its communal expressions.

 

FRIDAY

GENDER AS GEOGRAPHY: THE POSSIBILITIES OF PLACE-DRIVEN FICTION, with Morgan Thomas
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM PST/ 5:00 PM – 6 PM EST

There are stories only place can tell. Plot twists latent in soil, whole casts of characters linked by shared water, and geographic genderfluidities. In this craft talk, we’ll follow Julie Otsuka to an underground pool, Samanta Schweblin to rural Argentina, and Renee Gladman to Ravicka, noting the new story forms and subjects these writers have made possible by engaging place as a dynamic force, one that determines the characters and propels the plots of their novels. We’ll consider how gender, and other identities, are often co-created with place and ask what it means to tell stories that capture this entanglement between self and surrounding.

 

THE STORIES THAT GUIDE US, with Sasha LaPointe
3:30 PM – 4:30 PM PST/ 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM EST


Sometimes our own stories are heavy with grief and trauma; where can we look to for strength? This craft talk will focus on the art of weaving research into personal narrative, and what it means to look beyond our own experiences in search of resilience.

 

SATURDAY

THE BELOVED POEM: THOSE WINTER SUNDAYS BY ROBERT HAYDEN, with Paul Tran
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PST/ 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM EST

What did I know, what did I know / of love’s austere and lonely offices? This craft talk will examine how Robert Hayden constructed this unforgettable poem, “Those Winter Sundays,” and how the poem patterns language not simply to express but to enact its content. This craft talk will also examine how patterned language—when exacted very carefully and cleverly—can imagine for survivors of private and public trauma new ways to speak truth to power through form, ambiguity, and lyric indirection.

 

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT, with Elissa Washuta
2:00 – 3:00 PM PST/ 5:00 – 6:00 PM EST

In this lecture with generative components, Elissa Washuta acknowledges the land she and her Cowlitz and Cascade ancestors have been in relation with since the beginning of time alongside the other downstream and mid-river peoples. As we conduct the winter workshop online, each of us is situated on different lands we’re in some relationship with. What does it mean to develop relationships with places on the page? This talk will attempt to unsettle notions of setting and sense of place in writing, broadening beyond landmarks and furniture to consider other aspects of land, time, relations, meaning, and place-based knowledge.

 

I Can Write, Now What? with Jamil Jan Kochai, Alejandro Varela, and Laura Warrell moderated by Vanessa Chan
3:30 PM – 4:30 PM PST/ 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM EST

Writing and publishing a book is a series of choices (and a lot of second guessing those choices!). Have I written the right book? Have I written my book from the right perspective? Do I need an MFA first? Should I quit my job to write? Do I have the right agent / editor / imprint / publisher? Should this book even be out in the world? In this panel with authors Jamil Jan Kochai, Alejandro Varela, and Laura Warrell, moderated by Vanessa Chan, we will discuss the choices that go into the crafting of a book, and putting a book out into the world.

SUNDAY

THE POETIC LINE: BALANCING MYSTERY AND CLARITY, with Khadijah Queen
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM PST/ 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM EST


Writing poetry is part mechanics and part intuitive practice, and the balance between the two is a calibration mirrored in the unit of the line itself. In that spirit, via lecture and exercise, we will examine the poetic line as a catalyst and vehicle for meaning, even as they do the work of holding contradiction within the space of the poem. We will look at examples by writers like Carl Phillips, Justin Phillip Reed, Lorine Niedecker, Lucille Clifton, Diana Khoi Nguyen, and others to see the balance of mystery and clarity in action. Exercises and discussion will be aimed at demonstrating particularly how word choice, image, and pacing collaborate to invite the reader into the poem at the line level, allowing the poem to move toward a compelling life.

SOUNDS OF THE FUTURE: MULTILINGUAL POETICS AND THE POWER OF INTUITION, with Julian Delgado Lopera 
3:30 – 4:30 PM PST/ 6:30 – 7:30 PM EST

What if Spanglish was the default language of high literature? This lecture examines multilingual poetics i.e. the blurring of language frontiers. By looking at oral traditions, spoken word, language that’s fleeting and usually discarded as sites of creative brilliance. It explores intuition as a writing tool to help us awaken our storytelling ears and tap into these ripe places of linguistic possibility. For instance, how do we translate our aunties’ magnificent rhythmical storytelling at the beauty salon into a story? How do we use our grandmother’s tongue? A drag queen’s sassy monologue? How do we rescue language that doesn’t make it into “high literature”?  In this short lecture, Julián Delgado Lopera will examine the possibilities of oral storytelling to disrupt “proper” English and how intuition is one of our most treasured writing tools.

 

MONDAY

CONTOUR, GESTURE, AND REVISION, with Jeanne Thornton
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PST/ 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EST

We’ll talk about the final stages of revising a prose project—geared toward novels, but you could apply it to short fiction and nonfiction—through the lens of art teacher Kimon Nicolaides’s The Natural Way to Draw and its concepts of contour and gesture. We’ll look at a few texts, do some writing, and talk through some of the ways thinking about the contour and gesture of prose can help you navigate the sometimes major changes toward the end of a writing project. Come with questions you want to ask about your current writing project (whatever stage it’s at.) There will be a writing exercise and two very short drawing exercises, which I promise you will be totally okay and safe.

 

INDULGING COMPULSION: REPETITION IN NONFICTION, with Cyrus Dunham
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM PST/ 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM EST


“I am inclined to believe that there is no such thing as repetition. The inevitable seeming repetition in human expression is not repetition, but insistence.” – Gertrude Stein What can’t you not think about? What can’t you not want? What can’t you not say? What form does your powerlessness take? This lecture will ask how we might submit and surrender to, rather than resist, the parts of ourselves over which we have no control. Whether manifest in rage or resentment, fear or longing, we are concerned with how language – through repetition, rumination, and looping – registers compulsive thoughts and feelings. These affects of our suffering are not parts to be banished but modes of potential expression. In the laboratory of our writing, we can move towards, rather than away from, that which we so often disavow. We will explore compulsion at the level of the word and the sentence, its repercussions for both form and subject, pursuing repetition as a chance to understand what our psyche insists upon. What can be said twice that can’t be said once?

 

CUTTING TO THE QUICK, with Gabrielle Bates
3:30 PM – 4:30 PM PST/ 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM EST


How can we get as close as possible to what’s living and essential on the page? Using the knife as a central metaphor, this lecture will unpack the risks and rewards of poetry that “cuts to the quick,” discussing specific revision techniques and philosophical orientations toward the goal of empowering writers of varying aesthetics to craft language with more courage and care.