Daisy Hernández

Daisy Hernández is a former reporter for The New York Times and has been writing about the intersections of race, immigration, class, and sexuality for almost two decades. She has written for National Geographic, NPR’s All Things Considered and Code Switch, The Atlantic, Slate, and Guernica, and she’s the former editor of Colorlines, a newsmagazine on race and politics. Hernández is the author of the award-winning memoir A Cup of Water Under My Bed and co-editor of Colonize This! Young Women of Color on Today’s Feminism. She is an associate professor at Miami University in Ohio.

Praise

  • “Hernández writes to the heart of the story with immense tenderness, compassion, and intelligence. A riveting read.”

    —Angie Cruz, author of Dominicana

  • The Kissing Bug is a deft mix of family archaeology, parasite detective story, and American reckoning. A much-needed addition to the canon.”

    —Danielle Ofri, MD, PhD, author of When We Do Harm: A Doctor Confronts Medical Error

  • “An engaging, eye-opening read for anyone looking to learn more about the human suffering caused by the collision of a parasite and years of neglect by the United States’ medical system.”

    —Kris Newby, author of Bitten: The Secret History of Lyme Disease and Biological Weapons

  • “The engrossing account of a family medical mystery that led to a compassionate investigation of an underattended disease.”

    Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

  • “Daisy Hernández knows the impact of Chagas disease all too well. Her aunt died from it, and Hernández has since been fascinated by how it spreads and what that reveals about how we treat working-class people.”

    Bitch Magazine

  • “The engrossing account of a family medical mystery that led to a compassionate investigation of an underattended disease.”

    Foreword Reviews

  • “With The Kissing Bug, Daisy Hernández takes her place alongside great science writers like Rebecca Skloot and Mary Roach, immersing herself in the deeply personal subject of a deadly insect-borne disease that haunted her own family. It’s a tender and compelling personal saga, an incisive work of investigative journalism, and an absolutely essential perspective on global migration, poverty, and pandemics.”

    —Amy Stewart, author of Wicked Bugs